CONFAB 2019 | Plain language & simple design: How civic designers are building a better digital government for the people

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Though it may come as a surprise, there is a growing community in the federal government making more inclusive, accessible, and user-focused digital services for the public. While many in the industry opt for new and fancy design trends, when it comes to effective design, simple experiences and plain language consistently serve people better.
Aviva, a human-centered and visual designer at 18F, will dive into the world of civic tech inside the federal government, speak on the imperative working relationship between content and visual designers, and share lessons learned from breaking through bureaucracy to plant seeds of real change within the government.
In the full speaking presentation you will learn:
- Insights from prioritizing users and inclusivity in an organization more widely known for frustrating, rather than positive, interactions
- Lessons for close collaboration between content and visual design on human-centered teams, from the perspective of a visual designer
- How to work with a design system to balance consistency and familiarity, while maintaining personality and a specific editorial style, with examples from the US Web Design System.

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